50.0 – Zombies, Run! 101 with Naomi Alderman

December 1, 2016 0

un_zombies

Who says zombies are bad for your health? Author and game designer Naomi Alderman joins us from Israel to discuss her smash mobile apps, Zombies, Run! and The Walk. We also jaw about her new novel–The Power— plus inspiration, inclusiveness and other random thoughts.

But wait, there’s more! Unreliable Friend and Walkthrough host Julia Rios returns with questions for our guest. And we wrap up an overall Epic NaNoWriMo Fail with our final word count update. Spoiler alert: oh, the humanity!

49.0 – Author Spotlight: Marko Kloos

November 24, 2016 0

un_kloosStop your grinnin’ and drop your linen! It’s a bug hunt with military sci-fi author Marko Kloos! He shares some details about the upcoming Fields of Fire, the latest volume in his Frontlines series, as well as his writing process and assorted Hugos intrigue. Would you like to know more?

Review: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

November 25, 2016 0

It has been said films which are set in the 20’s do not do well at the box office, and I understand this is true of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which had, according to Warner Brothers, a somewhat disappointing opening weekend. If you are looking for all Harry Potter, all the time, of course you aren’t going to want to see this movie. It’s set in the US, and in a different time period. The central figure in the film is Newt Scamander, whom many of you might know as the author of the textbook Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find from the Potter series.

Turns out Newt is the Jane Goodall of the magical world. Newt has a mission–to help his fellow wizards realize the magical creatures they share the world with are not as dangerous as the ban in the US would make them appear. Well, let’s be realistic. They’re dangerous like all animals are dangerous, but Newt is a trained professional and unnaturalist, if you like. Newt’s a quirky, captivating character, very interesting and single-minded, so the film must be supported by some other emotional layers. Unfortunately, the female lead, an ex-female Auror, Tina Goldstein, is kind of lackluster and dull.

However, it is in the supporting characters where one finds the real emotional meat of the film. One Jacob Kowalski, a non-mag (Muggle to those of you in the know) ends up involved in the plot and seems like he will be the butt of jokes, but turns out to be a stalwart friend and yes, a romantic lead. Tina’s sister, Queenie, is a mage who reads minds, and is a charming, sweet woman. The chemistry between Queenie and Jacob is all the more poignant because Jacob is not allowed to remember his interactions with wizards at the end, a strange unnatural American law, as Newt points out to Tina.

The other emotional plot involves the manipulation of an orphan named Creedence, who has been adopted by theĀ  anti-Wizard organizer of Second Salem. Creedence is manipulated by Mr. Graves, a wizard high in the Magical Congress of the United States, who thinks he is the way to a dangerous young wizard who has a powerful, evil occulus. I can’t reveal much here without revealing a lot of spoilers, but this plot also has emotional depth, and also reveals Tina at her best.

If you want to see more of the Potterverse, as in not more Harry Potter, but more of J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World, this is a great way to go. Costumes are wonderful. Special effects are great. Newt is winning. Queenie and Jacob are fantastic. Go check it out and give it the love it deserves.

Miraculous (Miraculous Ladybug)

November 11, 2016 0

And now, for something completely different.

One of the things that my animation-loving spouse recently introduced me to was a new cartoon originating in France, but with an international cast of producers and animators. It is called Miraculous in the United States and Miraculous Ladybug in France. A mere three days after we failed to elect the first woman president of the United States and elected a president who sets women’s rights back 20 years or so, shows like Supergirl and Miraculous Ladybug become increasingly important for maintaining and elevating the status of young girls.

There’s a lot to like in Ladybug. Our main character Marinette, half Chinese and half French, is a normal teenage girl, tongue-tied in the presence of Adrien, her crush. She has a good friend, Ayla, and a snobby rival Chloe, and is supported by a cast of well-rendered high schoolers. These students are important because every episode, someone is evilized by the show’s thematic villain, the Papillion (called the Hawk Moth in English because that’s more villain like that Butterfly, I guess), and while the evilized villain isn’t always a friend, it’s good to have a stock of misunderstood adolescents to choose from.

Remember Adrien? The rich son of an overprotective father, he too has a superhero ID. Marinette’s Miraculous (a cute little bug-like creature called Tikki) turns her into Ladybug, upon whom Adrien has a crush. Adrien’s Miraculous (a catlike stinky cheese eater called Plagg) turns him into the Chat Noir, or Black Cat. The gimmick is that Adrien and Marinette have no idea who their partner actually is. Ladybug plays down Chat Noir’s flirtations, and Marinette is hopeless around Adrien, a well-maintained tension.

While the show is presented as a partnership in the U.S., Ladybug usually saves the day with her lucky charm powers and resourcefulness. Chat Noir and Ladybug are great friends and partners, good role models, and a lot of fun to watch.

I prefer to watch the show in French with subtitles. It’s good practice for my rusty French, and I always think original voice acting is usually the best performance. But for your kids, you can watch the show in English on both Nickelodeon and the Disney Channel. They can learn French later.

So, go watch this bright, colorful show with good animation. Show boys and girls how well they can work together and get along. Enjoy its quirky villains and Parisian culture.

Spots on! Or words to that effect.

47.0 – Marvel on Netflix

November 11, 2016 0

un_02Face front, True Believers! It’s Marvel time! But first, our Week 2 nano-NaNo update, which includes a limited selection from our full repertoire of election disappointment and anger. Take time to process the parody that our country has been reduced to, then back to the writing! Vamos!

Then we discuss Marvel’s Netflix universe–Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage and their upcoming additions. What worked? What didn’t? When oh when will we get our Rom: Space Knight show?

Caution: May also include tangents on comics in general. Because hey, we apparently like comics. A lot.

46.0 – Paradise Icon and NaNoWriMo

November 2, 2016 0

NaNoWriMo begins! We kick off our series of nano-NaNo updates with our Week 1 plans and progress. Also, Cath and crew recap our attendance at Icon and Paradise Icon last week in Iowa. Featuring special guests from the workshop: Emily Vakos and our very own Patreon sponsor, Chris Bauer!

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