21.0 – Patreon 101 with Taryn Arnold

May 15, 2016 0

We’re now on Patreon! As part of the process, Taryn Arnold from Patreonun_02 tells us about building a community and reaching an audience. She provides insight into how Patreon can enable creators to do what they love. If you’re thinking of setting up your own page, this interview will explain the basics. And if you love the show, consider supporting us on our own Patreon page! Or at least check out the supporting video. It has a dog and a cat.

20.1 – The City of the Future

May 10, 2016 2

un_scifuturesTrina Marie Phillips is the editor of the brand spanking new anthology, The City of the Future. This new release from SciFutures explores metropolitan life in near future and how it could impact humanity. The book features a short story from our own Christopher Cornell, L.A. Loves You. Chris and Trina discuss the project, futurism and science fiction prototyping.

The City of the Future is available in many formats: paperback, Kindle US, Kindle UK, Kindle AU, Nook, Kobo, Inktera/Page Foundry and Scribd.

20.0 – Author Spotlight: Laura Anne Gilman

May 5, 2016 0

un_gilmanLaura Anne Gilman writes across many genres, from mystery to science fiction to urban fantasy. Her latest novel, Silver on the Road, kicks off the new series The Devil’s West. She joins us to talk about the process of writing, reading as inspiration, alcohol, pets, and anything else that springs to mind. Find out more at her website and join her Patreon account to enjoy the Adventures of Duchess, P.I.

19.2 – Mosaics Anthologies

May 1, 2016 0

un_mosaicsCath interviews Kim Wells and Pavarti Tyler, editors of the Mosaics anthologies for independent women. All profits from the anthologies will be donated to The Pixel Project.

Full disclosure alert: A certain Unreliable Narrator has a story in Mosaics 2, which releases on May 1st! They discuss intersectional feminism, the editing process, Nicki Minaj, selecting stories, and working on what you love.

What Kind of Publishing is Right For Me? Preliminaries

May 1, 2016 0

With all the options available for publishing now, it’s a great time to be a writer.  You can quite literally pick the best way to get your work out there, and you can do it from project to project. In taking a look at the ins and outs of publishing, the first place I want to stop are the preliminaries.

So, you’re a new writer, and you want to get published. What are those first steps?

Please make sure you’ve written the very best book you can write. Let’s look at that under a microscope a little, because this is a bit tricky. First of all, is your book finished? Did you write a whole book? I cannot emphasize how important this is. If you have a whole book done and someone wants to see it, voila! you can ship that bad boy right out. If you don’t have a book done, well, there could be a rough all-nighter in your future, or you could hurry and send a book that is not reflective of your complete abilities, with revision process attached. So, before you query, get your book done. I know you’re excited by your project and you want to share that with others, but others won’t be excited unless they can see your whole vision. Again, I know why you want to send it out before you’re done. I don’t think there’s a single writer who’s not made that mistake. But it is kind of an amateur thing. My fellow narrators might disagree.

Now, in order to write the very best book you can, did someone else (besides your immediate circle) look at the book? It’s hard to get that right mix of readers for your work–people who are supportive, but will push you to do better. However, you need to find those people, and you’ll know when you find them. Patrick Rothfuss taught me (he doesn’t remember. He was on a panel, I was there.) about reader readers and writer readers. Reader readers are like the people who are going to buy your book and read it for fun. You need some of those, and I have 2-3 really solid reader readers, including my husband. And then you need writer-readers who can help you with the nuts and bolts of your story. Obviously I have unreliable friends and other VPXIIIers, and some friends from Taos Toolbox. You need to get readers to help you. Never send it out when you just finish. Never send it out at the end of NaNoWriMo. Let the cake cool, and let some friends look at it from all sides just to make sure you’ve frosted it evenly.

There are two more things that I should mention in preliminaries. Did you really write the best book you could? I sort of mean for now. You’ll get better with practice, experience, and if it interests you, education.  But do what you can within your current scope of skill to make the best effort to get that book out there that you can. Next, please expect to be rejected, and please learn to not let it get to you. Because that’s going to happen, and yes, that’s going to suck, but that’s going to happen, even if your book is beautiful and skillfully written. It’s the rare writer that gets a contract or agent with their first novel. I’m on something like my 8th, and I’m not there yet. The first 3 were total crap, the 4th and 5th ones not too bad, the 6th one was a hot mess, and the 7th one is my best yet. However, I am still unagented and unpublished. That’s not meant to depress you. That’s meant to give you a feeling of scope. It’s been a near miss with a couple of them. Be prepared for a long battle.

One more preliminary, and we’ll get down to how to approach agents and publishers next time. You will have people show interest in your work. When someone tells you that they want to see something from you, still take your time to write the best book you can and complete it. Still take the time to let your friends look over your work. I speak from experience when I tell you that an interested agent or publisher will still be there after you’ve taken the time to write the best book you can. Book 6 was a hot mess because Book 5 had an agent interested and I rushed it. I lost an opportunity there, I think. I learned from my mistake.

And that brings us to this: you will make mistakes. Not only will you get rejected, but you will also make mistakes as you learn about publishing. How can you avoid them? Well, you can’t, but that writer education does help, as well as hanging out with writer friends and asking questions. You’ll get better at it as  you go along.

Okay, so you have a book! It is a complete book and you’ve rewritten it by yourself a few times and gotten some guidance from good readers. You’ve proofed it, maybe even hired an editor (a few writers do this). Now it’s ready to go out into the world. What happens next? Well, that’s next time.

19.1 – Pick of the Week Blowout!

April 27, 2016 0

un_hugosThe Final Hugo ballot for 2015 was announced this week. There’s plenty to grouse about, but instead we congratulate favorites among the worthy finalists, like N.K. Jemisin, Anne Leckie, Lois McMaster Bujold, Neal Stephenson, Nnedi Okorafor, Mad Max: Fury Road, Jessica Jones, Strange Horizons, and Alyssa Wong.

Then we swiftly move on to celebrating things we’ve enjoyed recently, noms or no. It’s a Pick of the Week Blowout! Featuring: Merrily Watkins; Lively St. Lemeston; Warren Ellis’ James Bond; Harriet the Spy; Black Creek; The Lives of Tao; One-Eyed Jack; The Everything Box; Zombies, Run!; HexHatsune Miku; Panel Syndicate’s The Walking Dead; Forgotten; Godzilla Resurgence; Monster High; and The Ware Tetralogy.

Cath has big news, Chia can’t follow directions, George has been introducing his library to horror, and Chris misquotes Jimi Hendrix. Can you afford not to listen?

18.0 – Sound the Retreat

April 22, 2016 0

un_shoholaLast week we all gathered with a few good writer friends at our own writers’ retreat in Shohola, PA. Old house! Spooky woods! Creepy dolls! Limited internet! The perfect atmosphere for writerly productivity. We break down the long weekend and discuss the process of planting words firmly on pages. With short tangents on food, trolling and what the heck is going on with E’ville.

17.0 – Author Spotlight: Christopher Kastensmidt

April 15, 2016 0

un_ckBem-vindos! Author Christopher Kastensmidt joins us from Porto Alegre, Brazil to discuss his novelette series, The Elephant and Macaw Banner. (The newest book is out now!) He shares his influences, observations on the publishing industry in Brazil, and his plans for the future of the series. Fans of swashbuckling adventure won’t want to miss these stories, or the gorgeous cover art by Ursula “SulaMoon” Dorada.

Chris also shared recommendations for Brazilian science fiction and fantasy, starting with the winners of the Hydra Competition (Concurso Hydra, in Portuguese). Chris founded the competition in 2011, in partnership with Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show (IGMS), to bring outstanding Brazilian spec fic to an American audience.

The winner of the first competition was “Story with Pictures and Conversation” by Brontops Baruq (complete story), while second place went to “By a Thread,” by Flávio Medeiros Jr. (complete story). In the second competition, “The Other Bank of the River” by Camila Fernandes (subscription only) took the top prize. The finalists for the third edition of Concurso Hydra were announced March 13, 2016. Chris will translate all three stories, and IGMS will choose the winner.

A few of Chris’s other recommendations include “Act of Extermination” by Cirilo S. Lemos in The Mammoth Book of Dieselpunk (which also includes “Mountains of Green,” by our own Cath Schaff-Stump); And Still the Earth and Zero by Ignacio de Loyola Brandao; and “Salvaging Gods” by Jacques Barcia.

For more Brazilian science fiction and fantasy recommendations, check out Chris’s article “10 Autores nacionais de literatura fantástica publicados em língua inglesa no exterior,” which is in Portuguese, but includes links to stories in English. (Or you can try the Google translation, “10 fantastic literature of national authors published in English abroad.”) You might also be interested in Universo Insônia.

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